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Bret L Bret L is offline
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Two articles in this bird cage liner caught my attention. Bands are
asked about the Arizona lae-well, no they are asked whether they
should BOYCOTT Arizona. it's assumed that the law is wrong and the
state should be punished. Kim Gordon says she doesn't have any use for
Arizona.

KIM GORDON? That skank can't even play bass as well as I can, and
that's pretty ****ty. Who the **** cares what this incompetent with a
bass and a vagina thinks? I mean, there are a lot of women who can
play bass really well, Carol Kaye was the first to be really famous.
Kim Gordon is a period stain on the panties of the woman bassist.

No discussion was made as to WHETHER this law was bad or good.

This just goes to show that no society can survive the monstrous
regiment of its poets and singers and artists. Generally musicians
are ****ty leaders.

Then there is a piece on the Vegetarian Cougar, Chrissie Hynde and
her boyfriend who is half her age. Who gives a ****? I don't
particularly LIKE Chrissie, she's a first class bitch, but she's paid
her dues, she did her duty and birthed two healthy White kids, and if
she wants to get some young hard cock she's entitled.

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Boon[_2_] Boon[_2_] is offline
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On Aug 11, 8:55*am, Bret L wrote:
*Two articles in this bird cage liner caught my attention. Bands are
asked about the Arizona lae-well, no they are asked whether they
should BOYCOTT Arizona. it's assumed that the law is wrong and the
state should be punished. Kim Gordon says she doesn't have any use for
Arizona.

*KIM GORDON? That skank can't even play bass as well as I can, and
that's pretty ****ty. Who the **** cares what this incompetent with a
bass and a vagina thinks? I mean, there are a lot of women who can
play bass really well, Carol Kaye was the first to be really famous.
Kim Gordon is a period stain on the panties of the woman bassist.

*No discussion was made as to WHETHER this law was bad or good.

*This just goes to show that no society can survive the monstrous
regiment of its poets and singers and artists. Generally *musicians
are ****ty leaders.

*Then there is a piece on the Vegetarian Cougar, Chrissie Hynde and
her boyfriend who is half her age. Who gives a ****? I don't
particularly LIKE Chrissie, she's a first class bitch, but she's paid
her dues, she did her duty and birthed two healthy White kids, and if
she wants to get some young hard cock she's entitled.


Guess what, dip****? They don't care what YOU think, either. In fact,
they don't even know you exist.

The only reason articles like this get written is because they're read
and talked about. You know, by idiots like you. Spin, Kim Gordon and
Chrissie Hynde all thank you for your patronage.
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Jenn[_2_] Jenn[_2_] is offline
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.

Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. We say howdy at NAMM
each year. She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.
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MiNe 109 MiNe 109 is offline
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Default New Spin Magazine

In article
jennconductsREMOVETHIS-1FB85E.19441111082010@reserved-multicast-range-n
ot-delegated.example.com,
Jenn wrote:

In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


"Almost all" is a reach.

Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. We say howdy at NAMM
each year. She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Besides, she has sample bass lines on her website. Impressive to hear
some of those parts in isolation.

Stephen
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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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On Aug 11, 10:44*pm, Jenn wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them. *
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.

Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,

Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.

Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.

Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.

I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.



BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby

Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.

Here is my list!

1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


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Jenn[_2_] Jenn[_2_] is offline
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

On Aug 11, 10:44*pm, Jenn wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them. *
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.

Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,

Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.

Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.

Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Studio players get a lot of different sounds, appropriate to the gig and
what is asked for.



Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


At that time, yes.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.



BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby

Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Yep, as expected. I'm quite sure that no drummer is more recorded than
Hal; probably the same with guitar and Tommy, and bass and Carol.
Johnson (whom I never met) was the saxophonist on Pink Panther, IIRC.



Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.

Here is my list!

1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.

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In article
jennconductsREMOVETHIS-6E2344.20550111082010@reserved-multicast-range-n
ot-delegated.example.com,
Jenn wrote:

Johnson (whom I never met) was the saxophonist on Pink Panther, IIRC.


Yes.

Stephen
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On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:



In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. We say howdy at NAMM
each year. She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,

Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.

Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup

Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.

Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"

Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.

I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.

BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby

Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals

Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.

Here is my list!

1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar

Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


Tal Wilkenfeld will soon be on that list IMO.
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On Aug 12, 12:49*am, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"
wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


Tal Wilkenfeld will soon be on that list IMO.-


I had not heard of her
As it happens to be, two days ago I scheduled a recording ffor an
upcoming cable tv
performance of Jeff Beck, and wiki says she is the bassist on that.
the show will be airing in the next week or two, so I will get to see/
hear her play.
thanks
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Bret L Bret L is offline
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On Aug 11, 10:48*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
snip


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.

Here is my list!

1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar

Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


As a list of bassists _you like best_ it is well and good but as a
realistic list of the best, no.

Jaco was in a realm of his own technically, like John McLaughlin on
guitar, but also went so far beyond the traditional bass role he has
to be given an asterisk.Ofttimes the music needed another bassist to
hold things down when he went off on a tangent. From a strict bass
perspective that degrades him, like Bela Fleck as a banjo player.

Stanley Clarke therefore arguably ought to be Number One. Not as
facile, he's still a virtuoso and keeps the bass chair anchored.

Carol Kaye belongs higher. jamerson belongs up there but NOT Number
One.

Wyman, great guy, not a great technical bassist, neither is
McCartney, but Mc comes up with such simple but devastatingly
effective bass parts he can't be off if Wyman is on.

Entwhistle, sorry, technically too good and too influential to leave
off.

Sorry.


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AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.
Her claims are a crock of ****, according to those associated with
Motown at the time. She did play on stuff recorded at the Motown
LA studio, for the LA contingent of Motown
\artists,but she did not play on the Detroit stuff.

http://www.bassland.net/jamerson.html#motown


She has no reason to willfully lie, you schmuck.

She could be mistaken. Then again maybe not.
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On Aug 12, 10:23*am, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
snip







Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


*As a list of bassists _you like best_ it is well and good but as a
realistic list of the best, no.

Jaco was in a realm of his own technically, like John McLaughlin on
guitar, but also went so far beyond the traditional bass role he has
to be given an asterisk.Ofttimes the music needed another bassist to
hold things down when he went off on a tangent. From a strict bass
perspective that degrades him, like Bela Fleck as a banjo player.

*Stanley Clarke therefore arguably ought to be Number One. Not as
facile, he's still a virtuoso and keeps the bass chair anchored.

*Carol Kaye belongs higher. jamerson belongs up there but NOT Number
One.

*Wyman, great guy, not a great technical bassist, neither is
McCartney, but Mc comes up with such simple but devastatingly
effective bass parts he can't be off if Wyman is on.

*Entwhistle, sorry, technically too good and too influential to leave
off.

*Sorry.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


bass is simple, its about the pocket.
they guys who male the pocket and stay in the pocket are the best,
not the virtuoso soloists, in the final analysis.
bass is not meant to be a soslo instument
but it is a musical intrument, and musicality certainly counts.
bass makes the music and moves your feet.

That is why Jamerson, Bruce, Dunn are up there
Wyman and McVie are in their for superb interaction'with theior
drummers.
'MAcCartney didn't add anything to the music, which i didn't
like all that much anyway, so he is out

PAstorius is much higher than Clarke because of his musicality and
expression
he had wonderful feel for the music

aso, i realize i left out Tim Drummond

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PAstorius is much higher than Clarke because of his musicality and
expression
he had wonderful feel for the music


Yes, but he isn't playing BASS, even though he is playing A bass.

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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

On Aug 12, 10:23*am, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
snip







Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


*As a list of bassists _you like best_ it is well and good but as a
realistic list of the best, no.

Jaco was in a realm of his own technically, like John McLaughlin on
guitar, but also went so far beyond the traditional bass role he has
to be given an asterisk.Ofttimes the music needed another bassist to
hold things down when he went off on a tangent. From a strict bass
perspective that degrades him, like Bela Fleck as a banjo player.

*Stanley Clarke therefore arguably ought to be Number One. Not as
facile, he's still a virtuoso and keeps the bass chair anchored.

*Carol Kaye belongs higher. jamerson belongs up there but NOT Number
One.

*Wyman, great guy, not a great technical bassist, neither is
McCartney, but Mc comes up with such simple but devastatingly
effective bass parts he can't be off if Wyman is on.

*Entwhistle, sorry, technically too good and too influential to leave
off.

*Sorry.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


bass is simple, its about the pocket.
they guys who male the pocket and stay in the pocket


lol
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On Aug 12, 10:24*am, Bret L wrote:
AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.
Her claims are a crock of ****, according to those associated with
Motown at the time. She did play on stuff recorded at the Motown
LA studio, for the LA contingent of Motown
\artists,but she did not play on the Detroit stuff.


http://www.bassland.net/jamerson.html#motown


*She has no reason to willfully lie, you schmuck.

*She could be mistaken. Then again maybe not.


one does not require a reason, to lie.
not that she would not have any reasons.
Why do people lie? to impress other people,
to make themselves feel more important,
to gain advantage, or sometimes just because'
they like to put soemthing over on people.
I don't know her rationale, but it is pretty
clear she is not the bass player on all those Motown hits.

the other players and the producers of the stuff were pretty clear
about that.


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason! Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason! is offline
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Posts: 265
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 11, 11:59 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 12, 12:49 am, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"



wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. We say howdy at NAMM
each year. She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


Tal Wilkenfeld will soon be on that list IMO.-


I had not heard of her
As it happens to be, two days ago I scheduled a recording ffor an
upcoming cable tv
performance of Jeff Beck, and wiki says she is the bassist on that.
the show will be airing in the next week or two, so I will get to see/
hear her play.
thanks


Let me know what you think. IMO she's pretty amazing, especially since
she has been playing bass for just a few years.
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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Posts: 6,545
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 12, 6:17*pm, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"
wrote:
On Aug 11, 11:59 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 12, 12:49 am, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"


wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.

  #18   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason! Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason! is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 265
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 12, 6:57*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 12, 6:17*pm, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"



wrote:
On Aug 11, 11:59 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 12, 12:49 am, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"


wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A.. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question..


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


Tal Wilkenfeld will soon be on that list IMO.-


I had not heard of her
As it happens to be, two days ago I scheduled a recording ffor an
upcoming cable tv
performance of Jeff Beck, and wiki says she is the bassist on that.
the show will be airing in the next week or two, so I will get to see/
hear her play.
thanks


Let me know what you think. IMO she's pretty amazing, especially since
she has been playing bass for just a few years.-


Ok, the Jeff Beck show aired at 11AM today.
I saw aboput 30 minted of the recording so far.
Very impressive, a lot of good characteristiscs in how she plays.
Very musical, great feel. very reliable, Beck can vamp without any
worries abouot
getting back to where the song is.
Extremely nice tone. Very deep.
QUite a good bass she is playing
A Sadowsky, minimum price $2,800 just for a Japanese made model
probably a $6,000 or more USA bass, so it better sound good.
Its amaziong how many boutiques basses I really don't like.
So, it appears that it is made to replicate a 70's jazz bass.
Now, I never heard a jazz bass sound that good, go so deep,
nor have a sweet tone *up the neck (jaco;s did
have a sweet high end, nothing special in the bottom.)
so, I liked her, she has potentail to make my list

the problem is thatmy list is geared towards the kind of music I like,
and whether
the bass player is compelling, that is , do I want to keep listening
to
that player. Beck's style, sort of between rock and fusion, isn't
really my thing.
I put two fusion players on my list, Jaco and Clarke, ony because they
are such great players/
JAco is *much miore compelliung to me than Clarke, so he is higher on
my list.

OK, Tal isn't on my list, YET, but she might well end up there
someday.
there are some notable players I did not put on my list
Entwhistle, Mc Cartney and Noel Redding, fior various reasons.
I aqctually find her playing style a little bit like like Noel
Redding,s, but
with much better tone and feel and a ton more compelling, for me to
want to listen to her,

I sense that Jeff Beck is really happy and comfortable with
her backing him up.

Bittom line:
tal is making music, she contributes greatly to giving the song
its character. She doesn't fight the *music, or detract form it, nor
is she a hidden mechanical cog. She adds to the music.
Well done.

Only playing a few years? I would guess that she is
ar eal music lover and has spent a lot of time listening to music,
to know what it is supposed to sound like and feel like.
She probably has great ears. Great ears are better than
great hands.


Wilkenfeld began playing guitar at age 14. Two years later, at the age
of 16, she dropped out of high school, saying that "it just wasn't
going to work for me",[1] and emigrated to the United States. Upon
arrival, she studied electric guitar, but within the year made the
switch to electric bass[2] at the age of 17.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tal_Wilkenfeld

She was born in 1986 which would make her 24-25 and playing bass for
about 7-8 years. I think that's really remarkable. I hope she doesn't
"pull a Clapton" and stop growing musically. If she keeps pushing
there will be even greater things ahead for her.
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,545
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 12, 9:53*pm, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"
wrote:
On Aug 12, 6:57*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 12, 6:17*pm, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"


wrote:
On Aug 11, 11:59 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 12, 12:49 am, "Shhhh!!!! I'm Listening to Reason!"


wrote:
On Aug 11, 10:48 pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 11, 10:44 pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them.
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L..A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


Note, I am not an Entwhistle or McCartney fan.


Tal Wilkenfeld will soon be on that list IMO.-


I had not heard of her
As it happens to be, two days ago I scheduled a recording ffor an
upcoming cable tv
performance of Jeff Beck, and wiki says she is the bassist on that.
the show will be airing in the next week or two, so I will get to see/
hear her play.
thanks


Let me know what you think. IMO she's pretty amazing, especially since
she has been playing bass for just a few years.-


Ok, the Jeff Beck show aired at 11AM today.
I saw aboput 30 minted of the recording so far.
Very impressive, a lot of good characteristiscs in how she plays.
Very musical, great feel. very reliable, Beck can vamp without any
worries abouot
getting back to where the song is.
Extremely nice tone. Very deep.
QUite a good bass she is playing
A Sadowsky, minimum price $2,800 just for a Japanese made model
probably a $6,000 or more USA bass, so it better sound good.
Its amaziong how many boutiques basses I really don't like.
So, it appears that it is made to replicate a 70's jazz bass.
Now, I never heard a jazz bass sound that good, go so deep,
nor have a sweet tone *up the neck (jaco;s did
have a sweet high end, nothing special in the bottom.)
so, I liked her, she has potentail to make my list


the problem is thatmy list is geared towards the kind of music I like,
and whether
the bass player is compelling, that is , do I want to keep listening
to
that player. Beck's style, sort of between rock and fusion, isn't
really my thing.
I put two fusion players on my list, Jaco and Clarke, ony because they
are such great players/
JAco is *much miore compelliung to me than Clarke, so he is higher on
my list.


OK, Tal isn't on my list, YET, but she might well end up there
someday.
there are some notable players I did not put on my list
Entwhistle, Mc Cartney and Noel Redding, fior various reasons.
I aqctually find her playing style a little bit like like Noel
Redding,s, but
with much better tone and feel and a ton more compelling, for me to
want to listen to her,


I sense that Jeff Beck is really happy and comfortable with
her backing him up.


Bittom line:
tal is making music, she contributes greatly to giving the song
its character. She doesn't fight the *music, or detract form it, nor
is she a hidden mechanical cog. She adds to the music.
Well done.


Only playing a few years? I would guess that she is
ar eal music lover and has spent a lot of time listening to music,
to know what it is supposed to sound like and feel like.
She probably has great ears. Great ears are better than
great hands.


Wilkenfeld began playing guitar at age 14. Two years later, at the age
of 16, she dropped out of high school, saying that "it just wasn't
going to work for me",[1] and emigrated to the United States. Upon
arrival, she studied electric guitar, but within the year made the
switch to electric bass[2] at the age of 17.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tal_Wilkenfeld

She was born in 1986 which would make her 24-25 and playing bass for
about 7-8 years. I think that's really remarkable. I hope she doesn't
"pull a Clapton" and stop growing musically. If she keeps pushing
there will be even greater things ahead for her.-


I wouldn't be so hard on Clapton, most guitar players are pretty much
set
early on in their careers. I don;t think Page, Trower, Beck, Taylor
have grown
or changed all that much since past the 70's.

LOL! those are all British players, is that staid complacency a
British thing?

Tal is very nice the way she is, I would hope whatever growth she
exhibits
will not be of her ego. Keep playing the music, bass is not a solo
intrument.
I hope she dopesn't go off into incessant self indulgent solo land.
Although Jaco was an exception, he was so musical and expressive

Bass is relatively simple.
But waht i would hope to see is waht she can do with a fretless, which
opens
things up for her.
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Bret L Bret L is offline
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Posts: 1,145
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 12, 6:57*pm, Clyde Slick

Ok, the Jeff Beck show aired at 11AM today.
I saw aboput 30 minted of the recording so far.
Very impressive, a lot of good characteristiscs in how she plays.
Very musical, great feel. very reliable, Beck can vamp without any
worries abouot
getting back to where the song is.
Extremely nice tone. Very deep.
QUite a good bass she is playing
A Sadowsky, minimum price $2,800 just for a Japanese made model
probably a $6,000 or more USA bass, so it better sound good.
Its amaziong how many boutiques basses I really don't like.
So, it appears that it is made to replicate a 70's jazz bass.
Now, I never heard a jazz bass sound that good, go so deep,
nor have a sweet tone *up the neck (jaco;s did
have a sweet high end, nothing special in the bottom.)
so, I liked her, she has potentail to make my list


Instrument buyers are gullibards.

Sadowsky basses and guitars are built out of customiized CNC-house
commodity (i.e. Fender spec) necks and bodies. I don't think they even
do their own finish work, only assembly, fret dress and so forth. IOW
you might as well buy Warmoth and put it together yourself, havng a
pro do a final setup.



  #21   Report Post  
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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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Posts: 6,545
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 13, 11:18*am, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 12, 6:57*pm, Clyde Slick





Ok, the Jeff Beck show aired at 11AM today.
I saw aboput 30 minted of the recording so far.
Very impressive, a lot of good characteristiscs in how she plays.
Very musical, great feel. very reliable, Beck can vamp without any
worries abouot
getting back to where the song is.
Extremely nice tone. Very deep.
QUite a good bass she is playing
A Sadowsky, minimum price $2,800 just for a Japanese made model
probably a $6,000 or more USA bass, so it better sound good.
Its amaziong how many boutiques basses I really don't like.
So, it appears that it is made to replicate a 70's jazz bass.
Now, I never heard a jazz bass sound that good, go so deep,
nor have a sweet tone *up the neck (jaco;s did
have a sweet high end, nothing special in the bottom.)
so, I liked her, she has potentail to make my list


*Instrument buyers are gullibards.

*Sadowsky basses and guitars are built out of customiized CNC-house
commodity (i.e. Fender spec) necks and bodies. I don't think they even
do their own finish work, only assembly, fret dress and so forth. IOW
you might as well buy Warmoth and put it together yourself, havng a
pro do a final setup.- Hide quoted text -



I am not a craftsman, nor do I own tools, but I had
had two different craftsmeneach put together a finished
fretless to my specs, each one a little different,'
using Warmoth/Allparts/other bodies and necks
with specified hardware, pickups and finsihes.
Going all-out to produce something like, but not exctly,a Sadowsky,
(they have proprietary unknown origin
pickups) would be only about $1,200,
having someone else do it, compared to the 6 thousand
dollars for a US Sadowsky.

But it is a really nice bass and it can be admired.






  #22   Report Post  
Posted to rec.audio.opinion
Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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Posts: 6,545
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 13, 12:46*pm, ScottW wrote:
On Aug 11, 8:48*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 11, 10:44*pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them. *
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


*How do you leave Chris Squire off this list?

ScottW-


He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.

He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire


He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.

He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?

Stephen
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On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?



Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list

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On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


HAve you seen the Jeff Beck performance?
If so, what do you think of Tal Wilkenfeld?





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MiNe 109 MiNe 109 is offline
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?



Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list


I was going to mention him, too, for his fretless stuff.

Stephen
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MiNe 109 MiNe 109 is offline
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


HAve you seen the Jeff Beck performance?


No, but let me look...couldn't find it.

If so, what do you think of Tal Wilkenfeld?


According to YouTube clips, she's amazingly well-assured for her age but
all I heard was rock/funk so I don't about her range.

Austin is home to the much jazzier Esperanza Spaulding.

Stephen
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On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 wrote:
In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:

Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.

No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?



Now for a drummer list

just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)

1- Richie Hayward (Little Feat)
2 - Ginger Baker
3- Billy Cobham (ok, I let a jazz guy ior two slip, in)
4- Charlie Watts
5- Russ Kunkel
6- Terry Bozzio
7- Zigaboo Modeliste (Meters)
8 -John Bonham
9- Rick Schlosser (an relative unknown!` - with Nicolett Larson)
10- Jamie Jay Johanson (Allman Borther BAnd)
11- Dennis Chambers (ok, I let a jazz guy ior two slip, in)
12- Stanton Moore (Galactic)
13-Jim Keltner
14-Earl Palmer
15-Butch trucks
16-Phil Collins
17-Steve gadd
18-Vince Culloiata
19-Carmen Appice
20Jeff Porcaro
21-Jason Bonham
22-Corky Laing
23--Al Jackson (Booker T)
24-Mike Beard (ZZ Top)
25 Hal Blaine
26- John Vidacovitch ( Nawlins session man)








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MiNe 109 MiNe 109 is offline
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In article
,
Clyde Slick wrote:

Now for a drummer list

just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)

1- Richie Hayward (Little Feat)
2 - Ginger Baker
3- Billy Cobham (ok, I let a jazz guy ior two slip, in)
4- Charlie Watts
5- Russ Kunkel
6- Terry Bozzio
7- Zigaboo Modeliste (Meters)
8 -John Bonham
9- Rick Schlosser (an relative unknown!` - with Nicolett Larson)
10- Jamie Jay Johanson (Allman Borther BAnd)
11- Dennis Chambers (ok, I let a jazz guy ior two slip, in)
12- Stanton Moore (Galactic)
13-Jim Keltner
14-Earl Palmer
15-Butch trucks
16-Phil Collins
17-Steve gadd
18-Vince Culloiata
19-Carmen Appice
20Jeff Porcaro
21-Jason Bonham
22-Corky Laing
23--Al Jackson (Booker T)
24-Mike Beard (ZZ Top)
25 Hal Blaine
26- John Vidacovitch ( Nawlins session man)


Good to see those NO names up there. A friend showed me a Vidacovitch
instructional video. Impressive.

Nothing wrong with that list. Here are a few more names:

Chuck Buscuits (DOA, Danzig)
Dino Danelli (Rascals)
John Badanjek (Mitch Ryder)

Austin drummers: Chris Layton, Frosty.

Stephen
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On Aug 13, 3:52*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:

In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Now for a drummer list

just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)

I don' t doubt htat but why is your liking them so essential to us?

Are arguing for the primacy of YOUR tastes?


  #31   Report Post  
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Bret L Bret L is offline
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Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 13, 3:12*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:

In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list


Bootsy is an American institution. Gotta give him props.
  #32   Report Post  
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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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On Aug 13, 10:35*pm, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 13, 3:52*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:



On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Now for a drummer list


just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)


*I don' t doubt htat but why is your liking them so essential to us?

*Are arguing for the primacy of YOUR tastes?-


if your taste is white power rock, the Absolutely yes
'
  #33   Report Post  
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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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On Aug 13, 10:36*pm, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 13, 3:12*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list


*Bootsy is an American institution. Gotta give him props.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


so, waht kind of bass do you play?
i mean, the make and model and configuration of bass guitar, not your
style
  #34   Report Post  
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Bret L Bret L is offline
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Posts: 1,145
Default New Spin Magazine

On Aug 13, 10:40*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 13, 10:36*pm, Bret L wrote:



On Aug 13, 3:12*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list


*Bootsy is an American institution. Gotta give him props.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


so, waht kind of bass do you play?
i mean, the make and model and configuration of bass guitar, not your
style


I don't play bass. I have worked on a lot of basses. Guitars too.

I keep a couple of guitars around the house for idle amusement, but
no bass. Bass is only useful in a band.
  #35   Report Post  
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Bret L Bret L is offline
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On Aug 13, 10:38*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:
On Aug 13, 10:35*pm, Bret L wrote:



On Aug 13, 3:52*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Now for a drummer list


just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)


*I don' t doubt htat but why is your liking them so essential to us?


*Are arguing for the primacy of YOUR tastes?-


if your taste is white power rock, the Absolutely yes
'


No, it isn't. In fact I consider "white power rock" a contradiction,
as well as most of it sucking.

Skrewdriver were the canonical WP band-their music consisted of Chuck
Berry style tunes. See the contradiction?



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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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On Aug 14, 6:48*pm, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 13, 10:40*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 13, 10:36*pm, Bret L wrote:


On Aug 13, 3:12*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Bootsie (and Graham) left off because I don't appreciate theri styles,
they dopn't fit my criteria
it does nothing for me.
John Paul Jones is ok, but not up to being on the list
Levin, ok, not up to the list
Upon further reflecetion, I forgot to include Pino Palladino
in the mid late teens on my list


*Bootsy is an American institution. Gotta give him props.- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


so, waht kind of bass do you play?
i mean, the make and model and configuration of bass guitar, not your
style


*I don't play bass. I have worked on a lot of basses.


ok, you can change strings.
why bother if you don't play?
  #37   Report Post  
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Clyde Slick Clyde Slick is offline
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On Aug 14, 6:50*pm, Bret L wrote:
On Aug 13, 10:38*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 13, 10:35*pm, Bret L wrote:


On Aug 13, 3:52*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:


On Aug 13, 4:02*pm, MiNe 109 * wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


Chris Squire
He is exactly the kind of bassist I have no use for.


He goes absolutley nowhere extremely fast.


I would have said plodding or lumbering, but then I like his playing in
context.


No love for Bootsie? John Paul Jones? Tony Levin?


Now for a drummer list


just for a start, the ones I like (from rock music)


*I don' t doubt htat but why is your liking them so essential to us?


*Are arguing for the primacy of YOUR tastes?-


if your taste is white power rock, the Absolutely yes
'


No, it isn't. In fact I consider "white power rock" a contradiction,
as well as most of it sucking.

*Skrewdriver were the canonical WP band-their music consisted of Chuck
Berry style tunes. See the contradiction?-


Anybody looking for white racial purity in any type of rock and roll
is off base.
Yodelling is the purist form of white music there is, plus its almost
Aryan, to boot.
try putting some white power lyrics into yodelling, you will really
have something there, Bratzi.
  #38   Report Post  
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On Aug 13, 11:46*am, ScottW wrote:
On Aug 11, 8:48*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:





On Aug 11, 10:44*pm, Jenn wrote:


In article
,
*Clyde Slick wrote:


AS far as Carol Kaye, she claimed that it is her bass playing you hear
on almost all of the Motown stuff usually atrtributed to James
JAmerson.


This is a tough one. *There is very strong evidence that Jamerson played
those sessions. *And some also swear that Carol played on the Motown
sessions that she says she did, Hal Davis (who should know) among them. *
Sadly, the record keeping back then was horrible. *Today, one can go to
the Local 47 office and find out exactly who played what in L.A. since
about 1975 forward.


Carol is a nice person and an amazing musician. *I only played with her
a few times, as she is now effectively retired. *We say howdy at NAMM
each year. *She is, undoubtedly, one of the most heard musicians of all
time, up there with Hal Blaine, Don Randi, Stevie Gadd, the Candoli
brothers, Dick Nash, Howard Roberts, George Roberts, Tommy Tedesco,
Louie Shelton, and a handful of others whose names the vast majority of
music fans have never heard.


Its not reallyn a tough one. On the sessions in question, the Funk
Brothers conglomerate played them in Detroit,


Kayes' bio on Wiki does not credit her with the songs in question.


Kaye plays with a pick and strikes the string near the bridge.
Jamerson plays with his fingers and strikes the string near the pickup


Kaye's factors lead to a plinky, twangy sound,
while al Jamerson's factors lead to a deep thumpy sound.


Listen to The Beach Boys "Good to My Baby" form Beach Boys today,
you can hear what I am talking about.Kayes sound.
Compare that to the deep Jamerson rumble
of the Supremes "Come See about Me" or "Stop in THE
Name of Love"


Both players used early to mid 60's P Basses
and flat wound strings.


I think there is a small little similarity in parts of the lines for
Shake Me Wake Me (Jamerson)
and Good to My Baby, but a big difference ins sound and style.


BTW, look at all the greats who played on "Good to MY Baby


Hal Blaine - drums
Steve Douglas - tenor saxophone
Al Jardine - backing vocals
Plas Johnson - tenor saxophone
Carol Kaye - bass guitar
Mike Love - lead & backing vocals
Jay Migliori - baritone saxophone
Bill Pitman - guitar
Don Randi - tack piano, organ
Billy Strange - guitar
Ron Swallow - tambourine
Tommy Tedesco - guitar
Julius Wechter - conga drums
Brian Wilson - piano, lead & backing vocals
Carl Wilson - guitar, backing vocals
Dennis Wilson - backing vocals


Jamerson is the greatest electric bassist of all time, in my opinion.
Kaye was exceptionally good.


Here is my list!


1 James Jamerson
2 Donald Duck Dunn
3 Jack Bruce
4 JAco PAstorius
5 Jack Cassidy (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna)
6 HArvey Brooks
7. George Porter, Jr. (the Meters)
8 Nathan East (Clapton)
9 Darry Johnson (the Nevile Bros.)
10 Bob Glaub
11 Johnny Gaydon (AlbertCollins)
12 Chuck Rainey
13 Carol Kaye
14 John Doster (BB King, appx 1995-2005)
15 John McVie
16 Stanley Clarke
17 Bill Wyman
18 Lee Sklar


*How do you leave Chris Squire off this list?


Overly self-indulgent and crappy thin tone?

Just a guess.
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On Aug 14, 8:01*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:

Yodelling is the purist form of white music there is, plus its almost
Aryan, to boot.
try putting some white power lyrics into yodelling, you will really
have something there, Bratzi.


Let's take a moment to mourn Hank Williams again....





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On Aug 15, 12:13*pm, Glanbrok wrote:
On Aug 14, 8:01*pm, Clyde Slick wrote:

Yodelling is the purist form of white music there is, plus its almost
Aryan, to boot.
try putting some white power lyrics into yodelling, you will really
have something there, Bratzi.


Let's take a moment to mourn Hank Williams again....


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slim_Whitman
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